Mantis Tiller - Free Shipping

Posts Tagged ‘Organic matter’

Take care about potato storage between seasons

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010
Orka Vegetable Storage
Image by aMichiganMom via Flickr

Some pathogens, such as the silver scurf pathogen, may survive from one season to the next in the storage facilities themselves. Storages and handling equipment should be cleaned and sanitized or “disinfected” after the storage is emptied and before handling and storing the new crop. Disinfection of storages and handling equipment is a three-step process.

  • Remove dirt and debris. All the disinfectants approved for use in potato storages are rapidly tied up and rendered ineffective by dirt and organic matter. The next two steps of the process will be much more effective if the debris from last year’s crop is removed.
  • Wash with soap and water. This step is often accomplished with a pressure washer and a detergent solution. Warm or hot water will be more effective than cold water. Steam washers are also a good choice but will not actually disinfect storage surfaces or equipment because the duration of the exposure to steam is too short. Water and detergent help to dissolve and remove dried tuber sap and bacterial slimes that are deposited on storage surfaces and equipment, and detergents have some disinfection capability. Cleaned surfaces allow the disinfectant, used in the next step, to work properly.
  • Disinfect. Use an appropriate and registered disinfectant and make sure that the surfaces to be disinfected remain wet with the disinfection solution for at least 10 minutes. Use sufficient sprayer pressure and volume to effectively clean all surfaces.

Many fungal spores have tough, resilient cell walls, and bacteria in storages often occur in the form of dried slime. Ten minutes provides the necessary time for the disinfectant to penetrate the fungal cell wall or dissolve the bacterial slime and kill the pathogen.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Clubroot Disease of Brassicas

Tuesday, June 15th, 2010
Fresh Brussels sprout for sale at a farm in We...

Image via Wikipedia

Clubroot is the most debigating disease to affect all members of the brassica family including Brussels sprout, cabbage, cauliflower, calabrese and swede. This virulent fungal disease persists in the soil for many years (spores can lay dormant for over twenty years). Clubroot is frequently a major predicament on old allotment sites and kitchen gardens which have been cultivated for many years. There is no known cure, but by adopting the following strategies decent crops may still be generated.

Recognizing the Presence of Clubroot

Infected plants wilt during hot days and develop stunted red to purple tops.When lifted the roots will be swollen and club-like. In bad infestations the stench from the roots can be horrendous.

How Clubroot disease stretchs

Clubroot stretchs through the soil water and on footwear and garden tools.

How to Reduce the Severity of Clubroot

Despite there being no cure preparations can be taken to reduce the severity of the damage cautilized:-

  • Improving the drainage of heavy soil by making raised beds and incorporating organic matter in the form of garden compost or well-rotted farmyard manure helps massively.
  • Raising the pH to 7.0 or 7.5 by applying garden lime and thereby making the soil more alkaline is another worthwhile tactic. Putting two good handfuls of lime into each hole and watering the hole before planting may lessen the impact of this disease.
  • Growing seedlings in 9cm (in any case this big) pots of sterilized compost (growing medium) means a strong root system is in place at planting-out time, this make sures the plants are mature before the disease gets a grip.
  • Some gardeners go to the trouble and expense of taking out a large hole for each plant and replacing this with sterilized loam every time they plant their brassicas.

Brassicas Which are Resistant to Clubroot

The development of some brassicas which show resistance to this virulent fungal disease is the most considerable breakthrough in the battle to combat the debilitating effects of clubroot. Resistant strains include the following:-

  • Swede ‘Invitation’
  • Calabrese ‘Trixie’
  • Cabbage ‘Kilaxy F1’ and the larger Cabbage ‘Kilaton F1’ are both high yielding autumn/winter ballhead varieties of cabbage which show fantastic resistance to clubroot.
  • Cauliflower ‘Clapton F1’ matures in summer and autumn producing large white heads. Plants show a very high resistance to clubroot.
  • Brussels Sprout ‘Crispus F1’ is the latest addition to the clubroot resistant brassica stable. If it proves to be as good as the cabbage and cauliflower resistant varieties its future is assured.

Learn to Live With Clubroot

Where clubroot disease is gift in the soil it can not be get rid ofd, but the gardener by making raised beds to recover the drainage, applying organic matter as well as lime to raise the pH, and raising young plants in pots is able to reduce its impact and grow affordable crops. The development of more resistant varieties for all categories of brassicas holds out real hope for vegetable growers everywhere.

Quality Outdoor Structures C0808SGS Cedar Garden Shed (8 ft. x 8 ft.)

Enhanced by Zemanta

Get rid of Plant Fungus from the Garden

Saturday, May 29th, 2010
Fungus

Image by elycefeliz via Flickr

Garden fungus can ruin any crop, but it does not have to.  Preventing fungus diseases before they destroy your crop is essential, and proper garden management may keep chemical fungicide off consumables.

The number one fungicide is developing a disease resistant garden. Garden location, right composting and garden management and occasional use of pesticide treatments all aide in the ability of a garden to ward off pests and disease. Proper care for a garden will result in healthy plants, excellent crop production and future soil health.

Garden Location

Beckerman recommends placing a garden in a sunny well-drained area. Too much shade encourages the growth of fungus. Stagnant water also promotes fungal infection in plants. Locating a garden in the highest point available with the least tree cover will help any garden resist fungi and various other diseases.

Composting

Composting is another suggestion from garden experts. Mixing natural organic matter in soil promotes the development of soil microbes necessary to combat fungus advancement. Healthy soil promotes healthy plants, and healthy plants generate their own fungicide in the form of healthy immune systems ready to fight off infection.
Proper Garden Management

Proper garden management is another excellent fungicide. Experts recommend watering in early morning so plants dry quickly and never working in the garden when plants are wet. Overnight wet plants promote the spread of infection. Working on wet plants promotes the spread of bacteria, nematodes and fungus. Experts also suggest using only enough fertilizer to meet plant needs, as over-fertilization–especially nitrogen rich fertilizers-will promote fungal infection.

Organic Fungicides

When all else fails, experts suggest, “reaching for the chemicals.” Some vegetable garden fungicides are available that meet organic specifications, and those persons wishing to remain chemical free will want to start with them. Fungicides with the active ingredients Copper or Sulfur are approved for organic production, according to Beckerman. These fungicides will not leave a residue on the vegetables or penetrate the plant and build up harmful levels of toxins. Experts warn that improper diagnosis of a fungus or improper use of a fungicide may result in treatment failure.

Chemical Fungicides

If no other option works to treat the infection of a vegetable garden, chemical fungicides might work. Chemical fungicides may leave harmful residues in or on vegetable garden contents. Experts list fungicides with the active ingredients chlorothalonil, Captan, Mancozeb and Maneb as garden fungicides not approved for organic gardening.

[amazon trackingid=”httpblossomin-20″ keywords=”fungus garden” rows=”2″ columns=”3″ pagination=”yes” vertical=”yes”]

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]