Mantis Tiller - Free Shipping

Posts Tagged ‘Tomato’

Epsom Salt for Tomato

Thursday, June 10th, 2010
State fruit - Tomato

Image via Wikipedia

Tomatoes are one of  popular vegetables home gardeners grow. The satisfaction of planting and watching the fast growing tomato plants generate their red or yellow fruits can only be rivaled by the taste of a home grown tomato.

There are several points that a gardener has to be vigilant about regarding growing healthy tomato plants, and one of those is blossom end rot, which strikes just prior to the maturation of the tomatoes. Quite a disappointment for the gardener who has tended the tomato plants for weeks and greatly anticipated eating the fruits of his labor. Blossom end rot can be prevented, even stopped after it has already begun to attack a tomato plant, with several applications of Epsom salt.

What Cautilizes Blossom End Rot

Blossom end rot is cautilized by a lack of calcium in the garden soil. The calcium deficient soil is just not able to bring the tomatoes to the ripe stage before the fruit rots. Blossom end rot starts out as a small dark circle on the tomato’s blossom end and will stretch through the green or partially ripe tomato.

Prevent Blossom End Rot

To prevent blossom end rot, work Epsom salt into the garden soil before planting tomatoes. Apply one pound of Epsom salt to the standard sized raised bed garden (four feet by six-eight feet) or one cup of Epsom salt per container that tomatoes will be grown in and work into the soil well with a spade or tiller. The Epsom salt will then be a readily offered source of calcium and magnesium for the tomato plant.

Epsom salt as well promotes root growth and development for all garden vegetables and flowers and should be worked into the soil along with organic matter at the beginning of spring. A side dressing of Epsom salt or watering gardening vegetables with a combination of ½ cup of Epsom salt dissolved in one gallon of water a couple of times during the growing season will keep plants healthy and growing vigorously. When applying dry Epsom salt as a side dressing, be careful not to allow the Epsom salt to touch any part of the plant.

Stopping Blossom End Rot Once It Starts

If blossom end rot strikes tomato plants, it can be stopped and the plant can go on to generate healthy tomatoes. At the first sign of blossom end rot, remove all affected tomatoes from the plant and discard. Begin watering the tomato plant with an Epsom salt combination once per week. Dissolve ½ cup of Epsom salt into a gallon of water and slowly pour the entire gallon around the base of the tomato plant. The Epsom salt combination will go directly to the plant roots and be absorbed by the plant and stop future developing tomatoes from being afflicted by blossom end rot.

Tomato blossom end rot can be prevented or stopped after it has begun with an application of good old Epsom salt.

Organic Gardening Products

[amazon trackingid=”httpblossomin-20″ keywords=”Epsom-Salt-garden” rows=”2″ columns=”3″ pagination=”yes” vertical=”yes”]

Enhanced by Zemanta

Disease control on Tomato Plants

Thursday, June 10th, 2010
A scanned red tomato, along with leaves and fl...

Image via Wikipedia

No vegetable garden is complete without a few tomatoes. Who can resist a large, juicy Better Boy or a handful of cherry tomatoes? Like any plant, the tomato is susceptible to various ailment. The smart gardener will be prepared to combat ordinary predicaments, so as to insure a healthy harvest.

Ordinary predicaments with Tomatoes

There are certain ailment that affect tomato plants, and many are easily controlled. Sometimes, however, infected plants must be removed to protect the rest of the garden. Poor weather and soil states frequently determine which kinds of disease will attack tomatoes. ordinary predicaments to watch for include blossom end rot, timely and late blight, and specific kinds of soil fungus.

Blossom End Rot

Blossom end rot is a most irritating predicament, and is easy to notice. Fruits look normal on the top, but will have large, black spots on the blossom end. This is cautilized by a calcium deficiency in the plant. Blossom end rot can be combated by adequate soil preparation before planting. The soil pH should be maintained at 6.5; compost and bone meal can be added to the bed to supply calcium. Once the predicament has already occurred, control is complex. Calcium can be added in the form of Epsom salts, crushed egg shells, or powdered milk. It may be best to remove the infected fruits.

Fusarium and Verticillim Wilt

Fusarium wilt is cautilized by a fungus in the soil. Leaves begin to yellow at the bottom of the plant, and they eventually turn brown and wilt. Plants will die if the fungus is not controlled, and any plants that show symptoms must be removed and ruined. No chemical control is offered for this fungus, and care must be taken when replanting in infected soil. Try buying fusarium wilt- resistant plants, which will have an “F” after the name of the plant on the seed packet.

Verticillim wilt is as well cautilized by a fungus that originates in the soil. The fungus can live in the soil for many years, so crop rotation is a good thought. Symptoms include leaves that turn yellow and dry up. This disease is most ordinary during cool weather. Affected plants should be removed.

Tomato Blight

Tomato blight is a ordinary annoyance for avid tomato growers. timely blight affects the foliage, stems, and fruit of tomatoes. Symptoms include dark spots on leaves; infected leaves as well die prematurely. Copper and sulfur sprays can keep this fungus from growing, but sometimes the plant will need to be removed if it is too far gone. This prevents further contamination in the garden. Late blight affects the leaves and fruit of tomatoes and stretchs rapidly. Cool, wet weather is generally the cautilize of late blight. Symptoms include gray spots all over leaves and white mold. utilize copper spray to control late blight.

Prevention is the Key

As with any garden ailment, prevention is key. Once these predicaments have developed, they are complex to control. Tomato growers should prepare beds thoroughly before planting, spray tomato plants timely with fungicide control, feed plants regularly, and try not to overwater or let plants dry out. Every home garden can boast of a bountiful tomato harvest if plants are well cared-for.

Organic Gardening Products

[amazon trackingid=”httpblossomin-20″ keywords=”garden-pest-control” rows=”2″ columns=”3″ pagination=”yes” vertical=”yes”]

Enhanced by Zemanta