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Take care about potato storage between seasons

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010
Orka Vegetable Storage
Image by aMichiganMom via Flickr

Some pathogens, such as the silver scurf pathogen, may survive from one season to the next in the storage facilities themselves. Storages and handling equipment should be cleaned and sanitized or “disinfected” after the storage is emptied and before handling and storing the new crop. Disinfection of storages and handling equipment is a three-step process.

  • Remove dirt and debris. All the disinfectants approved for use in potato storages are rapidly tied up and rendered ineffective by dirt and organic matter. The next two steps of the process will be much more effective if the debris from last year’s crop is removed.
  • Wash with soap and water. This step is often accomplished with a pressure washer and a detergent solution. Warm or hot water will be more effective than cold water. Steam washers are also a good choice but will not actually disinfect storage surfaces or equipment because the duration of the exposure to steam is too short. Water and detergent help to dissolve and remove dried tuber sap and bacterial slimes that are deposited on storage surfaces and equipment, and detergents have some disinfection capability. Cleaned surfaces allow the disinfectant, used in the next step, to work properly.
  • Disinfect. Use an appropriate and registered disinfectant and make sure that the surfaces to be disinfected remain wet with the disinfection solution for at least 10 minutes. Use sufficient sprayer pressure and volume to effectively clean all surfaces.

Many fungal spores have tough, resilient cell walls, and bacteria in storages often occur in the form of dried slime. Ten minutes provides the necessary time for the disinfectant to penetrate the fungal cell wall or dissolve the bacterial slime and kill the pathogen.

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Wart potato disease

Thursday, September 10th, 2009

(Synchytrium endobioticum)

Wart is potatoes disease caused by Fungi.

Wart or black wart is widely distributed in temperate and high altitude tropical regions with cold and rainy climates. It may cause considerable yield loss where races of the fungus occur for which resistance has not been introduced. The disease is often associated with powdery scab and does not develop in warm or dry soils.

Symptoms of Wart

Tumors of any size up to several centimetres may develop on stems, stolons, and tubers.

Symptoms usually develop below-ground, but under wet conditions they may appear on stems and foliage. Initially, tumors are white to brownish or of the same colour as normal tissue. Tumors blacken with age and may rot because of secondary organisms. Aboveground warts are green, reddish, or purple, depending on variety.

Management

Varieties that are resistant to races of the fungus should be used. Reduce wart incidence with long crop rotations (5 years or more) in combination with resistant varieties.

Prohibiting the shipment of tubers, particularly seed from infested regions, is effective in limiting disease spread.

Seed of resistant varieties grown in infested soil can spread the disease as well as movement of infested soil or manure adhering to tuber surfaces, farm machinery, or other equipment.

STC EasyGrow Backyard Hobby Greenhouse


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